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Jgzazueta

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 #1 
hi everyone! I am new to the forum and wanted to introduce my self. My name is joe and im from Phoenix,az. My dad is originally from san antonio and he plays bajosexto and been playing conjunto music for over 40 years! Im also a bajo player myself been playing around 15 years. Also play bass and recently picked up the accordion. I am an intermediate player and was looking for some help from the more advance players that know more about this stuff.

My question is ... Can i dry tune my standard gabbanelli (no switches). I have a few boxes and recently picked up a new m100 wooden 31 button box (ead). I gotta say it sounds great but was looking to get that badass dry tuned sound from it but not sure if its even possible as ive heard that its not a good fit for the reeds in these boxes. There is a guy here locally that does tuning and repairs and i talked to him over the phone and i gotta say he left me with more questions than what he answered . Attached is a picture of my box . Again i wanted to say thx to everyone before hand and hope to get to know more of my fellow musicians. Saludos and gracias!

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texmex99

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 #2 
Hi there, and welcome to the forum.
I'm relatively new here, and from England, U.K.

You should be able to dry tune a Gabbanelli (as you can dry tune almost any button accordion). Many Gabbanelli's come from the factory tuned dryer than say the factory Hohner tuning.

I don't know specifically about the Gabbanelli M100, but most two voice 3 row button accordions, on the treble side have three reed blocks - one for each row of buttons. Each of these reed blocks have reeds both sides.

The one side, the reeds are tuned to concert pitch (also known as 440Hz), which gives you the actual note, for example a "G".
The other side, the reeds are tuned slightly "Sharp" - slightly higher in pitch to the "concert pitch" note.
When the button is pressed, both reeds are sounded to give you that tremolo effect where the two notes are trying to fight each other and gives that kind of beating sound.

By varying the pitch of the reeds on the "Sharp" side will distinguish how wet or dry the sound of the note will be. Wet will mean that the "Sharp" side reeds are tuned very sharp from the concert pitch reeds and will produce lots of tremolo. Dry will mean that the "Sharp" side reeds are tuned less sharp and more tuned to the concert pitch reeds and will produce little tremolo.

Someone tuning the reeds will use an electronic tuning meter that is graduated in "cents". There are 100 cents in a semi-tone. A semi-tone is the smallest musical interval - for example E to F is a semi-tone or G to G# is a semi-tone.  Tuners will use this theory when tuning the "Sharp" side reeds. 1 cents will be unison sound tuned to the same as the "concert pitch" reeds and say 28 cents will be very "wet".

I don't know how many cents is classed as dry tuning for an accordion, but I do know that "Conjunto Tuning" seems to be a kind of standard for dry tuning. "Tex-Mex Tuning" is a kind of semi-dry. Your tuner should know this, especially in the US, where this kind of music is mainstream.

Tuning the reed is quite simple. To raise the pitch, the reed is filed at the top and to lower the pitch, the reed is filed at the bottom.

Hope this helps.
gerardo148

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 #3 
Call Acordeones Roma in Dallas Tx. 
They can dry tune it.

214-336-6803

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Gerardo148
iturrios89

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 #4 
Try ziggie's music in Phoenix AZ 
JTAGLE

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 #5 
Sent you a PM
Kimric

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 #6 
 Your typical Hohner / Gabby / Weltmeister will be tuned about 15 cents wet from the factory ,but a vintage Italian piano accordion will be tuned 0-7 cents wet (this would be a very dry tuning).
I do this kind of work, but whoever does it bring them a sound sample of an accordion with the tuning you want.
Tuning the reeds up and down a few times will shorten the life of the reed as you have to take away metal each time, so you want to get it right the first time.

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Smythe's Accordion Center, Oakland CA since 1997 sales and service
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