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PENASOCCER

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 #1 
hi well i dont really want a studio i just want a cheap way for me and the guys to record and put down some original material so we wont forget it and do it to where it sounds kind of nice i would like to keep it as cheap as possible up to like 1000 bucks i need the following things:
 
(A PROGRAM).... inclined towards PRO TOOLS or SOUND FORGE
 
(connections)-- the connections im going to need meaning the actual little thing that hooks up to the computer and where ill be hooking up my instruments maybe something that can accomodate a few channels at a time
 
(any miscaleneous items i might need)
 
i usually shop at american musical dot com so if you find things there that could suit me for this thing it would be great
 
thanks.
 
dave

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iplaymexicanmusic

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 #2 
Unless you have exsisting gear already (like a 24 channel mixer)...you are not going to get much for 1000 dollars.
  When it comes to computer recording you must have the following specs:
Intel chipset motherboard
Intel Processor  P3 or higher
1 gig of ram minimum
2   40 gig hard drive.
  An HP, compaq, dell, gateway, are usually not sufficient enough from the factory. Its a pain in the butt even attempting to try.
  So you have to special order or special build (which is what i do) a computer which can cost $1500 on up.
  Then you have to decide on software! Only ones I reccomend are Sonar,Protools, Digital Performer, and cubase.  All these can cost from $400 - $2000 for entry level.
  Then you have to decide on Hardware. Such as a MOTU 2408, MOTU 24i/o, Protools LE digi 002 ...the list goes on and on.  Prices are $350 -$2600
 
My studio consist of Protools HD1 running on a PC that I built. Along with all the bells and whistles...total cost of $35,000 and counting.
 
 
What I would reccomend for you my friend is to look into a Roland 1680 or Roland 1880...they are "all in one" studios in a box....you can find them on ebay for around $450 - $800
  When I first got into digital recording I used the Roland 1680...which I still own and use. I love that machine and Im sure you will love it too.
  It has 16 tracks and 256 virtual tracks....8 analog inputs and outputs...2 effects boards (optional)...its awesome.
 
 
Hope this helps.
I know tons about this subject...if you have other questions just ask!
 
 
 
Patrick
http://www.myspace/gruponemesis 

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 #3 
Patrick is right on the money on this one.  You need to build a pretty hot dog computer to record a band (or just buy a Mac)....that would be your first hurdle.  Plus for Protools, you can't get an interface under $1000 that has more than 2 mic pre-amps unless you go with M-Audio stuff and ProTools M-Powered (which honestly isn't too bad for the weekend warriors and beginners).
 
I second the Roland VS Series.  American Muscial has a B-stock 1880HD for $899.  You might also want to compare it with the Tascam 2488.  Same price, and seems to have some pretty decent features for the price.  I've never used one, but it seems worth a look.

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 #4 

I also agree, the Roland is your best way to go.  Korg has some similar boxes but I prefer the Roland.  If you want to be able to record more instruments at once you can buy expansions to the Roland .  I personally like the convenience, portability and ability to record many tracks all at once.  So I really like the Alesis HD24 .  It pretty much records everything to hard drives. You can then use any 3rd party software to edit \ Master (pro tools).

 

http://www.alesis.com/product.php?id=1


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nanofuentes

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 #5 
hey if u just want have something that u want to just use to remember stuff n also give ur guys some thing to take home n pratice.. i just rec. the Tascam cd-rw900 for ur rack.. just hook it up plug it in n ur set..if ur gona use it at home for pratice n u dont use ur sub outs just subout 1-2 l n r for ur output so u dont have to overpower ur mix at pratice...  that will allow you to just sit back n do ur stuff at home n also good for live gigs.. its a good way to see what you need to work on.. in my eyes at least.. but if u want to even do it on u computer n want simple simple use acid so easy a caveman can do it... but the downfall u have to record 1 track at a time.. n its threw ur computer mic imput unless u go  geta usb/firewire board .. but it all depends on what u want to do.. but if u just want to remember some stuff n also record ur pratice just get that lil burner its gona cost u bout 600 or so but its good!!! it also plays MP3s lol
 
much love
PENASOCCER

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 #6 
thanks guys for all the help i might just go with a burner i want to be able to practice a song and then just record it
 
i want to record some songs for the upcoming competition for recording LOS COMPOSITORES
 
and also record my originals and keep them saved somewhere so i remember how they go

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PENASOCCER

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 #7 
 
im planning on buying this macbook so what else should i buy with it to start recording right away i dont need too many channels or things im using it to record my bands introduction, do radio spots and advertisements, and recording ORIGINAL songs just getting something down. maybe doing djing with it?
http://www.americanmusical.com/item--i-APP-MA699LLA.html#
 
from a simple microphone
http://www.americanmusical.com/item--i-SAM-Q1U.html
 
to a couple of channels
http://www.americanmusical.com/item--i-MII-FW410.html#
 
to a bit more
http://www.americanmusical.com/item--i-TAS-FW1082.html#

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PENASOCCER

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 #8 
http://www.americanmusical.com/item--i-AMS-RSP1.html
nice package

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 #9 
I'd say....
 
-The Macbook
-Digidesign Mbox 2 (even an Mbox Mini will work)
-That Recording Package you linked too will work.  You could break that out, like saaaayyy get some M-Audio BX5a monitors, A Rode NT1a, some Audio Technica M30 Headphones.  That would be a rockin little portable rig.  But if budget doesn't allow, that all-in-1 package will be a decent start.
 
And if you get good a Protools, and get some decent tracks going, you can easily take them to a larger studio and overdub, drums, etc...  The advantage of Protools, is that it is a widely used format in even the largest studios.

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otono

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 #10 
Fyi, MacMall.com also has good deals on macbooks. They will often throw in a free printer or RAM upgrade or other perks, too. I've bought several computers from them.

No matter where you buy it, I'd recommend maxing out the RAM from the start. Not only will it improve the performance of your computer when running protools, but you have the RAM has to be installed in pairs, not individually.

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PENASOCCER

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 #11 

thanks for all the info guys


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iplaymexicanmusic

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 #12 
 
 
Just an opinion...about the whole Mac and PC argument.
I dont ever recommend mac....because of the price...way to expensive!
Not to mention the software is expensive too.
   When it comes to performance the IBM and Alienware laptop series are just as tough or tougher for a third of the price.
  Just makes financial sense.
 
 
 
 
 
R50E

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 #13 
I knew this would come up.   It always does.
 
Here's my take.  When I first bought my Mbox, I built a PC ESPECIALLY for it.  At the time 3.0GHz P4, 2GB RAM, 2-74GB 10,000 RPM drives in a RAID array, was pretty smokin and it did run very well.  I had a few hiccups initially with the software (ProTools LE 6.4), but a few trips to the Digidesign website and a few hours, I had it tweaked out to where it ran just peachy.  Only once in a long time when I would use a lot of plug-ins at one time with a lot of tracks would I get any errors.  It ran great.  I was very happy.  I did however end up selling the PC as often happens with me.  Someone makes me an offer and if it's good....I sell.
 
Then, just out of sheer curiosity....I bought a Mac Mini.  ($499 at the time + keyboard, mouse, display...but I already had all that.)
 
It has a 1.2GHz processor, 40GB 5400RPM hard drive, External 160GB firewire drive for audio, 512MB RAM and honestly, it's never given me the slightest hiccup.  It runs ProTools LE 6.4 just as smoothly, and I've never had an error...not one...nor did I need to do any tweeks....it just worked right out of the box.  In my application, I never run more then two inputs at a time, although I do end up with some projects having around 16-20 cookin tracks with plugins.  Still runs great.  If you have ProTools HD and recording a band...well...yea, you need a MacPro, or the old G5....which are EXPENSIVE.
 
I also have an Alienware laptop that I use as a portable webcast encoder for my day job....it's killer too.  Can't argue with that.  Server performance in a portable package...(well it's rather huge and heavy for a laptop, but still.)
 
Bottom line though....Protools and Logic are optimally coded for the OS X/Macintosh platform and with good reason, since Apple owns Logic and has a vested interest in getting folks to use Macs.  Avid/Digidesign has less of a stake but has been working with Apple on platform optimization for years.  Both programs perform better with less hardware capability on that platform as compared to a PC/Windows computer, that much is clear.  And if you are on the small project end of things with machines like the Mac Mini ($599) iMac ($1099), MacBook ($1099), nowadays the Mac actually presents the better Performance/value ratio with Protools and Logic.  Not sure about other programs...but I like how Protools just seems to be so much more at ease on OS X.

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 #14 

David mi experiencia con Mac es que es una maquina exelente es el mercedes de las computadoras pero al igual tiene sus desventajas, yo tengo una pc alterada con 3gigs de RAM y Dual Core Pentium processors y corro Pro-tools LE, pero yo prefiero PC por muchas razones pero sobre todo en lo economico. Una cosa si te digo con 1000.00 no te va alkanzar pa mucho, comprate la grabadora Roland VS series economicas y salen buenas cosas de ahi compadrito. Cuidate y echale ganas!!


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agmcaballero

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 #15 

Estoy de acuerdo con Luis y los demas. Yo comence con el el Roland Phantom. Es una maquina que vale lo que cuesta. $1000 te consigue eso. Pero ya entrandole  te aseguro que vas a invertir mas y mas. Porque te va gustar mas y mas. Siempre ay tecnologia nueva. Echale ganas compa.


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 #16 

como bien te han comentado, yo acabo de comprar una pc, por el precio.. Mac es carisimo, tengo amigos que hacen cosas de manera profesional y no la cambian... pero es demasiada lana... finalmente compre una Gateway con 2 Gs en Ram, procesador Intel Core 2 Duo de 64 bit, y cada uno de 1.8 ghz, HD de 320 Gs, fire wire.. etc etc.. con una tarjeta de audio M-audio delta 192.. y vienen 2 Gs mas de Ram en camino... uso el Nuendo 3 y para la otra semana me llegan los monitores M-audio Studiophile BX5a y microfonos de condensador de la misma marca... y esto apenas empieza... y hace mucho se paso de los mil dolares.... algunas cosas eventualmente las reemplazare cuando haya mas lanita... pero con eso creo que por el momento es suficiente...  saludos y cualquier cosa estamos para servirte...


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Skweezboxmaniac

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 #17 
I guess Apple has not done a very good job in advertising the fact that it has some cost effective solutions that are great for home recording, besides the $2500 MacPro.  Allow me to show an example of a great little home recording system.

Computer system/Interface/Software: ~$1000

 - Apple Mac Mini - $599
 - WD Mybook 250GB External Hard drive (recording drive)- $100
 - Digidesign Mbox Mini w/ ProTools LE 7 - $300

Audio equipment - ~$400

 - AKG Perception 100 (Large Diaphram condensor mic) - $100
 - M-Audio BX5a (near field monitors) - $300

This assuming you have an existing monitor/keyboard/mouse, othewise add another ~$200 or so for that as the Mac mini doesn't come with any of that.  And also that you have some mic cables that you can use for the time being.

This is a great little system that I would bet my next paycheck that it performs well as a little home recording rig.  It's very upgradable, and as always you can take your ProTools session files into most high end recording facilites and continue your project there.

I'm not putting PCs down, (I'm on one of several that I've built right now )  It's just easier for Macs to perform better in the audio recording world because Apple only has to write OS software for their hardware.  That's why their PCs are so easy to use and they work so reliably...it's a closed box solution.  Windows and software written for it, consumes a lot of resources because it has to be written with every other piece of hardware on the planet kept in mind...it has to be everything at once....Therefore it takes more hardware (CPU speed, RAM, etc...) to accomplish the same tasks.

I just don't want the perception to be that you don't consider Apple as an option because of price.  It can be done.


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PENASOCCER

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 #18 

cool ill have to look into all these options


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iplaymexicanmusic

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 #19 
ooops forgot to mention all the tweaks that have to be made to a pc to get it ready for recording.
  On the other hand...if out of the box ready is what you are looking for...you can order a configured pc from one of many companies on the web....with your prefered DAW already installed and configured with the Interface you will be using.
All this is still cheaper that the powerful macs.....

Now if your looking to record only 2 tracks at a time like that one homie said....all these specs are overkill. I was able to record 24 tracks on a dell a couple of time with no hicupps.....

Ive gone from a ProTools HD1 system to a Motu HD192/Sonar 8PE running on PC
Im running 2 Motu HD192's (converters are sweet!!!!!)
Im able to record 24 inputs at the same time.....ive taken it up to 123 tracks with no crashes or hicups
im able to handle 60 tracks with 6 plugins running on each!
The PC is a quad core 3.0, 4 gigs of ram, p45 intel chipset, 3 500g HD's and 2 DVD combo drives...I built this PC for under $1300....try that with a mac
=)
You could order one like mine configured for recording for $1700 i believe.....


happy recordings!


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 #20 
Hey Dave why not try the Alesis Masterlink.

Create 24-bit Masters!
The Alesis Masterlink is the only way to create 24-bit masters on standard CD. Of course, we know that 24-bit audio won't work on a standard CD player. But tomorrow's technology relies on high-resolution audio. Masterlink puts you on the crest of this new wave. You'll have a permanent, archived 24-bit master, ready for the audio standards of tomorrow. Need a CD for personal use, a quick demo copy, etc? No problem! Your full-resolution, archived recordings you create with Masterlink can still easily download to 16-bit.

Alesis Masterlink At-a-Glance:

  • 40GB Hard Drive
  • Hi-res Masters plus Bit-depth and Sample Rate Conversion
  • Easy Updating
  • Balanced and Unbalanced Connectors


40GB Hard Drive
Inside the mighty Alesis Masterlink is a 40 gigabyte IDE hard drive, which provides nearly 450 minutes of astonishingly detailed 24-bit / 96kHz audio, or a whopping 1800 minutes of standard 16-bit / 44.1kHz audio (which still sounds incredible). No data compression is used in any part of the Masterlink's recording process. What's more, there are actually 12 different combinations of bit rates and sampling frequencies.

Hi-res Masters plus Bit-depth and Sample Rate Conversion
The Alesis Masterlink is capable of doing full sample rate and bit rate conversion on any data you send it. You can record high-resolution audio for editing (crop, join, split, etc), DSP and playlist creation. Burn CDs to full Red Book standards or create high-resolution "CD24" master discs. What's more, the ML-9600 offers built-in digital signal processing using the 32-bit SHARC DSP chip. This gives you the ability to handle tasks like sample rate conversion, noise shaping, equalization, normalization, peak limiting, compression and even full fade for straight-to-press CD generation! Until recently, you needed a computer and additional expensive hardware and software to perform those tasks. Now, with the Alesis Masterlink, it's all possible on one machine.

Easy Updating
As music technology grows, your Alesis Masterlink comes fully prepared to keep up with the changes. Updating your software is easy: simply pop a CD-ROM with the new features and enhancements on it into the onboard CD transport and you're up-to-date within minutes.

Balanced and Unbalanced Connectors
Connectivity? No problem. For connecting to your hard disk recording capabilities, Masterlink sports dual balanced XLR analong inputs (+4dBu) and unbalanced RCA connectors (-10dBv). There are also balanced XLR and unbalanced RCA output connectors. For digital input and output, the unit features AES / EBU standard I/O via XLR connector. If you need S/PDIF ins and outs, the RCA jack on the back of the Masterlink will operate at the electrical levels of S/PDIF and also utilizes the exact mechanical characteristics.

Alesis Masterlink ML-9600 Features:

  • Huge internal hard disk recorder...up to 10 hours of two-track audio capacity
  • Burn CDs using Standard "Red Book" (16-bit/44.1kHz) and high resolution formats...up to 24-bit, 96kHz
  • Choose any combination of digital resolutions (16-, 20-, and 24-bit) and sample rates (44.1, 48, 88.2, and 96kHz) with full AIFF compatibility
  • Organize song playlists with total control of fade-ins, fade-outs, track gain, start points, track cropping and more
  • Stores 16 different playlists containing up to 99 songs each
  • Onboard digital signal processing: compression, EQ, limiting, and normalization
    Create 24-bit Masters!
    The Alesis Masterlink is the only way to create 24-bit masters on standard CD. Of course, we know that 24-bit audio won't work on a standard CD player. But tomorrow's technology relies on high-resolution audio. Masterlink puts you on the crest of this new wave. You'll have a permanent, archived 24-bit master, ready for the audio standards of tomorrow. Need a CD for personal use, a quick demo copy, etc? No problem! Your full-resolution, archived recordings you create with Masterlink can still easily download to 16-bit.

    Alesis Masterlink At-a-Glance:
    • 40GB Hard Drive
    • Hi-res Masters plus Bit-depth and Sample Rate Conversion
    • Easy Updating
    • Balanced and Unbalanced Connectors


    40GB Hard Drive
    Inside the mighty Alesis Masterlink is a 40 gigabyte IDE hard drive, which provides nearly 450 minutes of astonishingly detailed 24-bit / 96kHz audio, or a whopping 1800 minutes of standard 16-bit / 44.1kHz audio (which still sounds incredible). No data compression is used in any part of the Masterlink's recording process. What's more, there are actually 12 different combinations of bit rates and sampling frequencies.

    Hi-res Masters plus Bit-depth and Sample Rate Conversion
    The Alesis Masterlink is capable of doing full sample rate and bit rate conversion on any data you send it. You can record high-resolution audio for editing (crop, join, split, etc), DSP and playlist creation. Burn CDs to full Red Book standards or create high-resolution "CD24" master discs. What's more, the ML-9600 offers built-in digital signal processing using the 32-bit SHARC DSP chip. This gives you the ability to handle tasks like sample rate conversion, noise shaping, equalization, normalization, peak limiting, compression and even full fade for straight-to-press CD generation! Until recently, you needed a computer and additional expensive hardware and software to perform those tasks. Now, with the Alesis Masterlink, it's all possible on one machine.

    Easy Updating
    As music technology grows, your Alesis Masterlink comes fully prepared to keep up with the changes. Updating your software is easy: simply pop a CD-ROM with the new features and enhancements on it into the onboard CD transport and you're up-to-date within minutes.

    Balanced and Unbalanced Connectors
    Connectivity? No problem. For connecting to your hard disk recording capabilities, Masterlink sports dual balanced XLR analong inputs (+4dBu) and unbalanced RCA connectors (-10dBv). There are also balanced XLR and unbalanced RCA output connectors. For digital input and output, the unit features AES / EBU standard I/O via XLR connector. If you need S/PDIF ins and outs, the RCA jack on the back of the Masterlink will operate at the electrical levels of S/PDIF and also utilizes the exact mechanical characteristics.

    Alesis Masterlink ML-9600 Features:
    • Huge internal hard disk recorder...up to 10 hours of two-track audio capacity
    • Burn CDs using Standard "Red Book" (16-bit/44.1kHz) and high resolution formats...up to 24-bit, 96kHz
    • Choose any combination of digital resolutions (16-, 20-, and 24-bit) and sample rates (44.1, 48, 88.2, and 96kHz) with full AIFF compatibility
    • Organize song playlists with total control of fade-ins, fade-outs, track gain, start points, track cropping and more
    • Stores 16 different playlists containing up to 99 songs each
    • Onboard digital signal processing: compression, EQ, limiting, and normalization

    • Here is the link to sweetwater they have it in stock. Its something you will need once you start adding to yours studio. Thanks Jay at Sound Temple Studios. I hope it helps you .

               http://www.sweetwater.com/c770--Alesis--CD_DVD_Flash_Recorders


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 #21 
i recomend get u just record live....is least expensive.....and you would have the hard material...and later on you can maybe record on a big studio....

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 #22 

protools and mac pro you will never go wrong

Skweezboxmaniac

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 #23 
Ahhh a resurrected thread....funny how old everything sounds and it was only a couple of years ago.

My rig has not changed too much: I still use a Mac Mini, but it's a newer 2.0GHz Core 2 Duo with the RAM maxed out at 4GB. Other than that it's stock with a LaCie 500GB Firewire 400 drive as the Record disk. All running ProTools 8 LE with an Mbox 2 Pro.

Since it's still just my little project studio, I've still only recorded 2 inputs at a time (even thought the MBox 2 Pro is capable of 4), but I have projects with around 25 tracks with Multi-effects and Dynamics Plug-ins and a few virtual instruments and the little Mini has handled it all fine. No Problems yet.

I still use the M-Audio BX5s for monitoring, but I now use a Mackie Onyx 1220 that I originally had for other stuff to do signal routing/cue mix stuff. It makes the latency problem while tracking go away as well as makes interfacing external gear like tube mic pres and compressors easier.

Only other additions to the little studio family is a Rode NT1A and couple of pairs of Sony 7506 Headphones.

Cheers,

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iplaymexicanmusic

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 #24 
Hey Aaron you should try a Motu Interface....something like a 1296 or hd192....man the converters are freakin awesome!!!
    They match up (in my opinion and that of my peers) to the Protools HD192 and 96 interface.....they are that good.!!


They are the only interfaces that feature the high quality converters on the Motu lineup.
My cousin has an Apogee 16x ad/da...and I still think my setup sounds as clean and transparent as his....he gets pissed lol....cuz the Apogee cost $6000!...and my Motu was $1700 lmfao


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 #25 
Here's what we used to record our new CD, LOBO IV - Ambicion.

MacBook Pro Laptop
$3,500

Logic Pro Software
$1,000

Mackie Mackie Onyx 1640 16-Channel,4-Bus Analog Recording Mixer with Optional FireWire Card Slot
$1,400 (The Firewire Card slot costs an additional $400)


The best part about this set up is that our studio can travel with us wherever we go.
Plus it's a MAC and not a PC so you don't have to worry about viruses picked up from the Internet.

Yep, it is a lot of money but in the long run if you think about it, when you're paying $25-$60 and hour for studio time to record, it's worth the investment.

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Skweezboxmaniac

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 #26 
Quote:
Hey Aaron you should try a Motu Interface....something like a 1296 or hd192....


Yea, I've heard good things about those boxes, and I agree...seems expensive but they're a bargain for what you get.

For me though, I really can't justify spending a lot of money on what I do in my little project studio. Pretty much all I do is some songwriting, arranging, and maybe some demo work here and there for local singers. Honestly, the fidelity of the converters for what I'm doing really isn't a deal breaker for me. I don't think even if I had money to burn, I would spend a lot more on my rig.

Another thing is I don't want to learn new software. I've been running Pro Tools since version 4.1 on 888s and a PowerPC. I've used Logic and Soundforge at work and those were OK, but I didn't use them enough where I got really good at either of them.

Pro Tools LE does everything I need it to, and even stuff that I'll never need. Along with having software that I know and can run fast on, all I emphasize for my stuff are good mics, a good tube preamp, a clean outboard compressor for tracking, and a couple of different sets of monitors that I know well. I think I've pretty much got it down..... until the next new thing comes out.

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hrndzjr

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 #27 

Lets resurect this thread once more. I have been looking in to some recording equipment nothing fancy, but I dont want the cheapest easiest stuff out there either. Maybe just recording practice or laying down a few tracks. A lot of the stuff on the threads I have read is two years old or more.....yea outdated at two years....and while still good some you cant get anymore. So help me out what is good for a begginer in the world of recording????

Skweezboxmaniac

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 #28 
Nowadays there are a ton more options.  Depends on what you feel comfortable doing, how much money you have and what you already own.

You could do something as simple as Garageband on an iPad with a Blue Snowball mic.  That'll give you 8 tracks with virtual instruments and effects.

Do you want a dedicated hardware appliance?  There are still a few recorders out there that will do 8 or more tracks on dedicated hardware (not a computer), but yet after you're done you can burn it to CD or import it into a computer for upload to the internet or further editing on a computer.

There's a whole bunch of stuff in between too, especially if you have a decent computer that was made within the last few years.

Let us know a few more details,

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hrndzjr

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 #29 

no trying to become a pro or nothing just to record my current band and I got into song writing years ago, would like to see some of that on demo type stuff, lay down a few tracks. While I do own an I pad, I am not big on Mac stuff and I just think they can get expensive and you can do just as good with a PC for less than half the price at times. I have PC that I bought maybe 6 months ago(upgraded) and one that I built maybe a year ago that I think still runs better than the one I bought. As far as budget, always a good idea to set one although did not really think about one as long as I get close to what I need. i I get something like a zoom16 or 24 which I hear are good, do I still need a software??? Does it help to have both to use as interface?  Thanks

Skweezboxmaniac

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 #30 
I was going to recommend the Zoom R series as well.  What I like about those is that there is no booting up, or loading programs, messing with the intricacies of computers.  If all you want to do is play music first and get it recorded fast and easy, then those are cool little devices...especially to record the whole band.  Computer interfaces tend to be very expensive when you start adding up the inputs.

When you hook the thing up to your computer, I believe it acts as an interface as well and you can also dump all the tracks from it as standard .WAV files into a DAW like Pro Tools, Logic, Cubase, etc...  It comes with Cubase LE which is good enough to get you started.

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"I must be willing to give up what I am so that I may become what I will be"
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"Knowledge is learning something everyday. Wisdom is letting go of something everyday."
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juliojuarez

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 #31 

Hey i was looking for a cheap way to record and i got a TASCAM US 1800.  It comes with cubase already and it is really affordable.  I recorded a song already and was very happy with the resutl. heres a link

I really recomend it. Its very easy to use and way under 1000.

jrhernandez562

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 #32 
I Record With A Mac G5 8 Gigs A Ram A Digi 002 Behringer ada8000 pro tools 8 Le mxl mics and they seem to be doing the job I also use for monitoring some shure shr250 and some events Prostuido 8
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